Stop living for results.

We sabotage our health by reducing our eating, exercising, meditation, mindfulness into independent fragments to fit into our very “Americanized” formula to get results. Our “doing” things to get a profit (result) or to make a profit off of what we “do” not only flows from the bowels of consumerism, but it is a fundamental belief that goes against our very design as human beings. 

Look at the true masters of thought, art, musicians, living, religion, writing and even athletics, and you will see the recognition, enjoyment and a real experiencing of one’s divinely given truths, talents and skills. Look at Vincent Van Gogh who died penniless, a William Thoreau who lived in a shack by a pond, a Søren Kierkegaard who uses all his money to publish his books and Mother Theresa, Rosa Parks, Anne Frank and Jesse Owens (to name a few). 

When we use the gifts that we have been given to get results, then we sabotage the gifts that we are naturally designed to experience and enjoy. By using ourselves and our gifts to get results, to self-promote and to validate who we are, we misunderstand ourselves and our design, we shortcut the process of growth and the process of practice and living, and we rob ourselves of the real purpose of what we do. 

It’s time to remember who we are and how we are designed to live without a camera, phone or result being the motivation or determination of success. It’s time to remember how we are designed to Breathe, Listen, Ask, Look and Move!

“I am not overly enthusiastic about the various “spiritual exercises” in meditation or yoga which some consider essential for release from the ego. For when practiced in order to “get” some kind of spiritual illumination or awakening, they strengthen the fallacy that the ego can toss itself away by a tug at its own bootstraps. But there is nothing wrong with meditating just to meditate, in the same way that you listen to music just for the music. If you go to concerts to “get culture” or to improve your mind, you will sit there as deaf as a doorpost.” -Alan Watts